“Secret” Dark Web Links?

People often ask me if there are “secret” or “hidden” dark web links that aren’t available on the public link lists. In fact, someone did so yesterday, which was what prompted this post.

To be honest, I think this is one of the many myths about the dark web; people explore the few links that are on The Hidden Wiki (or similar link lists), find them boring, and then ask, “Where’s the real interesting stuff?”

Well, as I mentioned on All Onion Services: New URL, if it isn’t on that site (with regard to Tor at least), it isn’t anywhere. Not only does that site have v1 onions, but also v2 and v3 (the ones with 50 characters).allonionsv2_edited

Of course, finding actual onions that are online when using All Onion Services can be quite difficult, as none of them are labeled or sorted into categories. Yet, as I’ve also mentioned on quite a few other blog posts, there are many link lists and search engines on Tor.

While these may not index everything, I’ve managed to find some interesting sites through these methods. In past posts, I have referenced several other link lists, which I still use to this day. I’ll include those here, plus a few that I just came across:

http://jdpskjmgy6kk4urv.onion – Welcome to Dark Web Links and More!

darkweblinks&more

http://darkdirmpmoq3uur.onion – DarkDir

http://zlal32teyptf4tvi.onion – Fresh Onions

freshonions

http://xvwhmrw3sgwwmkko.onion – Atlayo Search Engine

http://5jgis47vdcpaeafp.onion – La Wiki Oculta (for my Spanish readers!)

http://deeplinkdeatbml7.onion – DeepLink

In addition to these, there are the various search engines, such as the following:

http://hss3uro2hsxfogfq.onion – not Evil

notevil_edited

http://visitoroymk3ouq7.onion/search – VisiTOR

http://gjobqjj7wyczbqie.onion/ – Candle

candle_search_edited

http://msydqstlz2kzerdg.onion/ – Ahmia (also at http://ahmia.fi)

ahmia

http://bznjtqphs2lp4xdd.onion – Welcome to Dark Web Links Search Engine

welcome2darkweb_edited

These are just a few examples, but my feeling is that if you can’t find what you’re looking for on one of these link lists or search engines, it probably isn’t there. If you’re looking for something besides Tor, try I2P or Freenet.

Here are a few I2P links:

http://0thers.i2p

http://abhishek.i2p

http://closedshop.i2p

http://cokeandcoffee.i2p

http://darkhardwarelab.i2p

There are many others, but that’s what I could find at the moment.

Every so often, I do come across sites I haven’t seen before, but the content on them tends to be about the same: marketplaces, forums, fraud sites, scams, wikis, and the occasional game site or weird site.

Other than that, if you’re just looking for sick content (that doesn’t involve children), it’s probably on the clearnet – contrary to popular belief.

If there’s something I missed here, feel free to tell me, but I think that about covers it.

 

 

 

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Tor vs. I2P vs. Freenet: Difference?

GMpeM

When people think of the “dark web,” usually what comes to mind, if anything, is Tor. After all, it’s the one that’s been in the news most often, and the terms are inextricably linked.

If you’re new here, I should mention that in a couple of my previous posts, such as How to Access the Dark Web with I2P! and Exploring the Dark Web on Freenet (Part 3!), I elaborated on I2P and Freenet a little bit. These two are other popular anonymity networks that, like Tor, attempt to preserve users’ privacy. For the curious, I will sum up the three of them.

Tor

tor_linux

Tor, as I’ve mentioned on some earlier posts, is both a network and a browser. The browser is available at Tor Project. (Speaking of which, they just released a new version of the browser, which you should download if you want to use it!)

The network attempts to keep you anonymous while browsing online by directing your web traffic through a worldwide system of relays and nodes (a.k.a. the Tor network).

The browser, on the other hand, is a fork of Firefox, which is optimized for privacy. It includes plugins such as HTTPS Everywhere, which encrypts communications on a number of major sites. It also includes NoScript, which helps prevent exploits via plugins like JavaScript, Java, and Flash, and protects against attacks like cross-site scripting (XSS)and clickjacking.

Here’s one of the confusing parts: the sites that people often refer to as the “deep web” or “dark web” are technically called “Tor hidden services” (.onion sites). One of the other features of Tor is that you can host websites on it anonymously – thus why it’s so popular. I’ve listed quite a few onion sites on previous posts, but if it’s your first time here, these are a few examples:

Fresh Onions

Ahmia Search Engine

Daniel’s Hosting

Contrary to popular belief, not all onion sites have illegal or disturbing material on them. In fact, some are very bare bones and, dare I say, boring. That’s probably because the point wasn’t for them to be scary.  A good majority of onion sites are more technically oriented, although there are a plethora of scams too.

I2P

I2P_router_console_0.7.7

I2P, like Tor, is an anonymous overlay network. However, there are a number of differences between the two:

  • I2P is message-based. Communications are end-to-end encrypted, and each client application is referred to as a “router,” so to speak. The client has their router build several inbound and outbound tunnels, i.e. a pathway to another machine on the network. Each user on the network chooses the “length” of these tunnels, and finds a happy medium between anonymity and speed, depending on what he values. This is referred to as “garlic routing” (as opposed to onion routing).
  • I2P has its own interactive services, like web browsing (using any traditional browser like Firefox or Chrome), plus email, chat, file-sharing, messaging, blogging, and a distributed datastore (like that of Freenet). See more about this at I2P Services.
  • Unlike Tor, I2P can be used for torrenting, using applications like I2P Snark or the Bittorrent network: Bittorrent over I2P. While you technically can torrent over Tor, there’s a great chance that it will break your anonymity.

This is only a very basic summary – if you want to know more, click the links there and you can read some of the technical documentation.

Freenet

freenet_scifi

Freenet is a peer-to-peer (P2P) network which allows you to anonymously share files, send messages, and publish websites that are, in theory, resistant to censorship. It also uses what’s called a “distributed datastore” for the purpose of filesharing. In other words, users “donate” a portion of their hard drive so that other users can share files (the datastore is encrypted, however).

When you first join the network, you are given a cryptographic identifier (key), which, in essence, becomes your “name.” (Think of it like James Bond’s 007 name.) The key looks something like this: http://localhost:8888/freenet:USK@ZVtoHFm~Lm5FctbjloVYwQ0b5KaAae6TeQGk8fswJs4,kRR5rHBQuNpaiFqZE-v3Rtv0e~LWFFbxbh9tAt44UEM,AQACAAE/ffffff/12/  And you thought onion links were hard to remember!

One major difference between Tor and Freenet is that all of the Freenet sites are listed in directories that you can find inside the network (which isn’t always the case with Tor). For example, there is one directory called “Nerdageddon,” which lists many (but not all) of the Freenet sites. However, it excludes pornographic sites and other such material:

freenet_nerdageddon

When you click on a site, your computer “downloads” the page from Freenet, and you must wait for it to load before being able to browse it:

freenet_downloading_censored

Although it’s for different reasons, Freenet, like Tor, tends to be slow. Again, it’s a trade-off between anonymity and speed, so it depends on which you value most. As opposed to Tor, if you want to join social networks or forums on Freenet, you need to download various plugins, such as Sone (a Facebook-like social network) or WebofTrust.

The upside of this is that you aren’t downloading programs from some random onion site  that you happened across, which may or may not have malicious intent. Plus, Freenet has the option of operating in either “opennet” or “darknet” modes. In opennet mode, you connect to anyone on the network, whereas in darknet mode, you connect only to friends.

Summing it Up

In any case, I find all of these networks to be interesting, and if you’re curious, I say explore them. Just know what you’re getting into, and if you don’t understand something, read the documentation or ask.

That’s not a crime, is it?

 

There Is No Marianas Web, But . . .

isolation-threat-dark-web-100697135-large

by Ciphas

I’ve noticed that a popular question regarding the deep/dark web lately is about “Marianas Web,” which is supposedly the “deepest” level of the deep web. Well, I hate to tell you this, folks, but there is no such thing. There never was.

I believe I’ve referenced RationalWiki’s Deep web entry before, but it really is a great reference if you want to know the honest truth about it. I love the idea of there being “levels” to the web, but it’s the stuff of sci-fi.

Nonetheless, as I’ve mentioned on some previous entries, there are many anonymity networks other than Tor in existence – this might be the kind of thing that people are searching for…what else is out there?

So far, I believe I’ve discussed I2P, Freenet, and ZeroNet to a degree. If you have yet to explore these, take a look. There’s some interesting stuff to be found.

Oh? What’s that you say? You’ve already used these and found nothing? Well, as they said on All Onion Services:

The truth of the matter is there isn’t very many online onion services. Of those that are online, most aren’t worth visiting. They’re scams, phishing attempts, or low-traffic forums that are going to stop existing after a week. You should very quickly realize this after using a “real” index or search engine. No, your inability to find awesome secrets or spooky media is not because you haven’t found the right index/search engine. It’s because that stuff isn’t there. At least not on the “deep web.”

allonions_2

Yeah, that might be disappointing, but even I was surprised to find, upon my first day visiting Tor, that it was far from what the horror stories had made it out to be. Most of what I clicked on turned out to be dead links, in fact.

Still, I was interested in what other networks might be out there, which was how I ended up coming across the variety of wireless mesh networks and P2P networks that were (or are) actively being developed.

One that interested me a lot was Netsukuku (maybe just because of its name), because it was not only a mesh network, but also, as the developers stated, meant to be “autonomous.” (How’s that for your giant A.I. separate from the internet?)

Mother_Brain_Metroid_Zero_Mission

Unfortunately, it appears that Netsukuku is no longer being developed, though I think you can download some releases of it from repositories:

Netsukuku Dyne.org

Index of /netsukuku

It may be that you can compile and install it, but there aren’t a whole lot of peers to connect to. I’ve experienced this on some other P2P networks, like Osiris Serverless Portal System, which I mentioned on a much earlier post.

osiris_sps2

Osiris is a network that allows the anonymous creation of web portals without a central server – like Tor, its concept was to protect data and resist censorship. Unfortunately, it doesn’t seem to have been updated in a long time either. You can try it out if you like at the link above.

Anyhow, my concept of a “Marianas Web” would be this: a censorship-resistant, private network that is not connected to the internet, and could only be accessed by a select group of people.

It, like Tor, would disguise your IP address and encrypt messages, but might also allow things like P2P file sharing. It would be interesting if it had types of services that you couldn’t find on Tor, to differentiate the two.

Want to create one? I’ll join you on there in a minute.

P.S. You want liiiiiiiiiinks, don’t you? Here:

Evilweb Forum

Closed Shell Systems? Nope!

I’m writing this in response to a comment I received on my previous post. It reads:

I have DN42 connected. When I ‘dig @172.23.0.53 chaos’ this returns SERVFAIL or REFUSED. Same with ChaosVPN and Anonet DNS.
What is .chaos TLD? Closed Shell System?

To my knowledge, there is no such thing as the top-level domain “.chaos.” That being said, I’m not surprised if someone is spreading this kind of misinformation around, because the same thing has happened in the past, with software that supposedly allows you to access “.lll or .rdos sites,” or “.clos sites.”

There is no such thing as a “closed shell system.” Whoever created that original “iceberg” misinfographic (the one located here: https://imgur.com/pj0jbtP) helped perpetuate the myth, by claiming that a “closed shell system” was required to reach deeper levels of the deep web. I know I’ll never convince everyone of this fact, so there will always be some people out there believing it.

chaosvpn_wiki

On the other hand, if you create a hidden network of your own (like a VPN-based one), it’s possible that you can make up your own domain names for it, though they won’t be considered official ones by the Internet Assigned Names Authority (IANA). dn42, for example, has sites built on top of it with the domain name “.dn42.” ChaosVPN has sites built on it with the domain name “.hack,” and so on and so forth.

I mentioned this on an earlier post, but if you go to ICANN.org, they have a list of all the approved TLDs that exist right now: List of Top-Level Domains. There are also Pseudo-top-level domains, which are names for computer networks that don’t participate in the official DNS, and may or may not be part of the internet. This would include VPNs like dn42.

links

Connecting to dn42 is fairly simple, as you can reach it via tunnels from other networks, like OpenVPN, Tinc, or Edge. Full sets of instructions can be found here: dn42 how-to. That being said, if something doesn’t exist, you certainly can’t connect to it!

I think that the “closed shell system” concept might be a reference to Ghost in the Shell, or something along those lines, which, although interesting, is pure science fiction. Any network that exists has some way of accessing it, given the right hardware or software, and/or permissions.

Beyond that, just because it’s a hidden network doesn’t mean it has any special, secretive information on it. Hate to disappoint you!

Still, it could be interesting – just stay in the realm of reality, OK?

P.S. These are some of the existing networks/software that I know of, if you’re interesting in checking them out further:

Tor

I2P

Freenet

dn42

GNUnet

CICN

OneSwarm

Retroshare

ZeroNet

Tribler

Netsukuku

Freifunk

FunkFeuer

10866

The Real “Deep Web Levels”

Ever since those ridiculous “infographics” came out in 2013 claiming that there were “levels” to the deep web, people seem to constantly be asking how to access them. Specifically, this is the one I had in mind:

Deep_web_lies

I know I’ll never convince everyone of this, but as I mentioned in my previous post, there are no levels to the deep web, or dark web.

What really exists are different anonymity networks, which achieve this in different ways. Obviously, the most widely used one is Tor. I’ve probably explained how it works in earlier posts, but Tor disguises your identity and location by encapsulating your communications in layers of encryption, analogous to the layers of an onion.

The sites that people frequently refer to as “deep web sites” are technically called “Tor hidden services.” Tor makes it difficult to trace the locations of the servers from which these sites are running, thus why they tend to involve criminal activity, like fraud, narcoctics, and weapons sales.

Beyond Tor, there are other networks, like I2P, Freenet, ZeroNet, and Umbra. And, as I mentioned in my last post, there are also the mesh routing networks, made up of radio nodes. These networks accomplish anonymity in different ways than Tor does, but they mostly have the same purpose: send email, send messages, share files, and set up websites without revealing your identity.

I’ve discussed Tor, I2P, and Freenet in various posts, but haven’t talked about the last two yet.

ZeroNet is a newer network that uses bitcoin cryptography, as well as Tor, to achieve anonymity. The way that it uses Tor is that your communications are sent through the Tor network, much like if you were using the Tor browser itself.

zerohello

As with Tor, you can use ZeroNet to send email, build websites, send messages, and download files anonymously. ZeroNet, at the moment, doesn’t have its own unique browser. However, you can configure Firefox or other browsers to use ZeroNet. It’s actually not that difficult.

ZeroNet’s downside, at present, is that only a small community of users seem to be taking advantage of it. So, if you want to build the community, join and tell your friends about it!

Umbra, on the other hand, I have yet to experience, but I’m planning to try it out as well. Its creators are the same innovators behind the Shadowcash cryptocurrency. I think Umbra should be the subject of a future post. The GUI of Umbra, oddly enough, looks similar to ZeroNet. I’m not sure if one influenced the other in any way.

umbra

Anyhow, as for “deep web levels,” the only thing more confidential than these networks would be the top secret networks used by the U.S. government, like SIPRNet, NIPRNet, JWICS, CAVNET, and GWAN, which are used to share sensitive or classified information. Other governments have similar networks, though at the moment, I don’t know their names.

Even if you were to access them, they probably wouldn’t be as interesting as the movies make them out to be. Too bad, huh?

I’m sure that no matter what, I’ll never convince everyone that there are no special “deep web levels” that you can somehow access, but one person can only do so much.

My suggestion is to check out the real networks that do exist, and educate yourself on what you find. You never know – it could be fascinating!

(Unlike the one below – if it’s so secretive, why is it using Windows 3.1?)

imwghhzrv8LmRSsDbP2hDvmyDG5dlYLMQ7brOdlXDVo

Darkfox: Access the Dark Web with Ease!

darkfox

NOTE: Darkfox will not help you access .clos, .rdos, .lll, or .loky domains. Those don’t exist!! It will help you access .onion, .I2P, and 127.0.0.1:8888 URIs.

by Ciphas

This may sound like an infomercial, but I swear it’s not.

Those of you who use darknets, in particular Tor, I2P, and Freenet, might have noticed that it can sometimes be inconvenient to have to run each one in a separate browser, or at least have to launch the programs separately.

Well, I found a program that makes it simpler to connect to any of these three networks with a simple command: it’s called Darkfox Launcher.

Its advantage is that it lets you access Tor, I2P, or Freenet without having to change your configurations every time. Plus, it’s very simple to use.

The GitHub page goes into a little more detail, but one of the most important questions it answers is: “How does Darkfox Launcher work?”

Here’s the answer: “Darkfox Launcher works by first changing the default profile of the Firefox Portable software and with that, changing the default network configuration. Once this phase is done, Darkfox will proceed by launching the Darknet proxy software to make the connection to the Darknet chosen by the user. When completed, Firefox Portable will boot to the default startpage of that specific Darknet.”

Darkfox is also a convenient way of quickly accessing one of these networks if, say, you need to contact someone through the network and don’t want to go through the process of installing, for example, I2P.

Included in its software package are these things: Firefox Portable Edition, and the proxy software from the Tor Project, the Invisible Internet Project (I2P), and the Freenet Project. If you’re unfamiliar with each of these, it might help to check them out individually first!

So what’s my opinion? I’ve been using it for a little while now, and while it does have a few bugs, I love it. (Besides, what software doesn’t have bugs, especially in the early stages?)

And you may have noticed that, since it’s on GitHub, Darkfox Launcher is also open source. To that end, if you want to fork it and contribute to the code, feel free.

Now, its downside is that it isn’t as secure as the actual Tor browser. So, if you’re doing some kind of hardcore whistleblowing, or engaging in illicit activities, I don’t recommend Darkfox for you. It’s still a work-in-progress, though, so future versions will probably have improved security features.

On a side note, this may just be nostalgia, but its UI reminds me of both the DOS command prompt and the Bash Unix shell. *Nerding out*

While it may not be about bells and whistles, I think Darkfox Launcher accomplishes its purpose well. For more information about it, check out the Darkfox Read Me: https://github.com/blacklight447/Darkfox-Launcher/blob/master/README.md.

If that’s not enough, take a look at its source code here: https://github.com/blacklight447/Darkfox-Launcher/blob/master/darkfox%20code

darkfox_sourcecode

Who knows? Perhaps in the future, it will have the ability to launch Tor and do your taxes.

How to Use I2P on Android Devices

by Ciphas

i2p_android

I’m well aware that not all “dark web” users prefer the Tor network (which I’ve mentioned in a few previous posts).

As I wrote about in How to Access the Dark Web with I2P!, I2P is one of the three most popular anonymity networks at the moment, next to Tor and Freenet. Out of those three, however, it’s arguably the most complicated to use.

That aside, if you already use it, and are interested in the Android app, it’s simple to download. Go to I2P – Android Apps on Google Play, and install it.

If you’re already familiar with using Tor on Android, then you may know the browser Orfox; download that first, from Google Play – Orfox.

device-2015-06-30-133152

As with the standard version of I2P, you need to configure your proxy settings to be able to connect to it on your mobile device.

Depending on which device you have, these may be in a different area, but this tutorial explains it quite well. (With the exception that the Orweb browser is outdated.)

To sum up – you’ll need to configure your proxy settings to 127.0.0.1 (localhost), port 4444 (HTTP). After this is finished, open the I2P app again and hold down the button that says “Long press to start I2P.”

i2p_longpress

Once you’ve started I2P, the app has to find peers on the network. This should only take a few minutes at most (depending on your connection, of course).

Finally, go to the “addresses” tab. There should be some default I2P sites (eepsites) listed there. You can add others if you wish. Actually, on my device, there was only one eepsite listed by default.

If you tap on the name of one of the eepsites, it may ask you which app you want to use to open it. Obviously, the tried and true Firefox is good. You can also use Orfox, as I mentioned.

Also, if you tap the “tunnels” tab, you’ll see which client tunnels and/or server tunnels are running. By default, some of the ones that run are the I2P HTTP/HTTPS Proxy, Irc2p, and smtp.postman.i2p (simple mail transfer protocol):

i2p_tunnels

You can, of course, customize it by adding your own client tunnels or server tunnels using the red “plus” button in the lower righthand corner (maybe that could be a subject for a future blog post…yesssss….).

Interestingly, the tutorial I referenced above recommends Lightning Web Browser, because it’s open-source and built for privacy, speed, and efficiency. It can also send traffic through Tor or I2P, and can be set to use DuckDuckGo or StartPage as its standard search engines. So give that one a try. If you’re curious about the source code, it’s here: GitHub: Lightning Browser.

Now, as for some other eepsites you can try out, here are some suggestions (but I haven’t vetted all of these, so some may not work):

https://sochi.i2p

https://speedie.i2p

https://sponge.i2p

https://nightfort.i2p

https://planet.i2p

https://oniichan.i2p

I hope that’s enough to get you started. Anyhow, have fun. I2P may not seem as “creepy” as Tor, but I would like to get a few more people to try it out, and maybe build more of a community on the network.

Enjoy your visit, friends!