“Secret” Dark Web Links?

People often ask me if there are “secret” or “hidden” dark web links that aren’t available on the public link lists. In fact, someone did so yesterday, which was what prompted this post.

To be honest, I think this is one of the many myths about the dark web; people explore the few links that are on The Hidden Wiki (or similar link lists), find them boring, and then ask, “Where’s the real interesting stuff?”

Well, as I mentioned on All Onion Services: New URL, if it isn’t on that site (with regard to Tor at least), it isn’t anywhere. Not only does that site have v1 onions, but also v2 and v3 (the ones with 50 characters).allonionsv2_edited

Of course, finding actual onions that are online when using All Onion Services can be quite difficult, as none of them are labeled or sorted into categories. Yet, as I’ve also mentioned on quite a few other blog posts, there are many link lists and search engines on Tor.

While these may not index everything, I’ve managed to find some interesting sites through these methods. In past posts, I have referenced several other link lists, which I still use to this day. I’ll include those here, plus a few that I just came across:

http://jdpskjmgy6kk4urv.onion – Welcome to Dark Web Links and More!

darkweblinks&more

http://darkdirmpmoq3uur.onion – DarkDir

http://zlal32teyptf4tvi.onion – Fresh Onions

freshonions

http://xvwhmrw3sgwwmkko.onion – Atlayo Search Engine

http://5jgis47vdcpaeafp.onion – La Wiki Oculta (for my Spanish readers!)

http://deeplinkdeatbml7.onion – DeepLink

In addition to these, there are the various search engines, such as the following:

http://hss3uro2hsxfogfq.onion – not Evil

notevil_edited

http://visitoroymk3ouq7.onion/search – VisiTOR

http://gjobqjj7wyczbqie.onion/ – Candle

candle_search_edited

http://msydqstlz2kzerdg.onion/ – Ahmia (also at http://ahmia.fi)

ahmia

http://bznjtqphs2lp4xdd.onion – Welcome to Dark Web Links Search Engine

welcome2darkweb_edited

These are just a few examples, but my feeling is that if you can’t find what you’re looking for on one of these link lists or search engines, it probably isn’t there. If you’re looking for something besides Tor, try I2P or Freenet.

Here are a few I2P links:

http://0thers.i2p

http://abhishek.i2p

http://closedshop.i2p

http://cokeandcoffee.i2p

http://darkhardwarelab.i2p

There are many others, but that’s what I could find at the moment.

Every so often, I do come across sites I haven’t seen before, but the content on them tends to be about the same: marketplaces, forums, fraud sites, scams, wikis, and the occasional game site or weird site.

Other than that, if you’re just looking for sick content (that doesn’t involve children), it’s probably on the clearnet – contrary to popular belief.

If there’s something I missed here, feel free to tell me, but I think that about covers it.

 

 

 

Advertisements

All Onion Services: New URL

Awhile back, I mentioned the site All Onion Services (AOS), which lists every .onion site that exists on Tor. At one point, it had existed on the clearnet at onions.system33.pw, but this is no longer the case. (“system33”, a.k.a. Matt Traudt, is one of the developers. Thanks, Matt!)

At present, the site can be found on Tor at http://jld3zkuo4b5mbios.onion/. While this is true, the developers have expanded their site since I last wrote about it.allonionsv2_edited

As before, however, this link list is, as they put it, “The longest and least useful onion index in the galaxy.” Does this mean it includes illegal stuff? Sure, but good luck finding it! I’d also describe it as the most boring-looking onion index in the galaxy, but that was probably on purpose as well (wink).

I have attempted, in the past, to find “interesting” sites just by clicking random links on AOS, without much luck. Most of the ones listed are not online (which they mention). One difference between this updated version of the site and the original is that this one lists next-gen onion services (both v2 and v3).

V3 onions have 50 characters in them, so there are a lot more possibilities for an onion URL now (but don’t ask me to memorize them). Here are a few examples:

http://hnvcppgow2sc2yvdvdicu3ynonsteflxdxrehjr2ybekdc2z3iu63yid.onion/

http://x5id3qfgzppwxe5fyzxrkrczohc675atmygdresvx7nuexqnlsvorryd.onion/

http://nfctdewc36j6womh4ibm3tyu7glqdtc3at6can7uzmz7shfgho6773id.onion/

http://bypwnyfl4lwrlxduryjsnp5wijrus45ftolxqcbzkazk7biwbpidpnid.onion/

Because these are somewhat new, most aren’t online (nonetheless, this is the case with the v1 onion services too). If you are looking for onion links that are online, I’d suggest using some of the link lists that I’ve mentioned before, such as Fresh Onions, or The Onion Crate (which also has some of the v3 onion services).

the_onion_crate_edited

If you can read the picture (which you probably can’t), I’ve got some more links in there! Here, just for you (descriptions are accurate, I promise!):

http://3xeiol2bnhrsqhcsaifwtnlqkylrerdspzua7bcjrh26qlrrrctfobid.onion/ – Riseup Red

http://occgshn6gz4je57wyhpijni7waod6yxpxwihjdxjwrnpjtbayliei2id.onion/ – Cyberia Cafe and Club

http://oqwc4xrfgysdgw52tercv56vl2tfk5u7r6dspr2g2mwsj3dvb7zef4id.onion/ – Daniel – Onion Link List

http://hsqluhqe6dlfl7jaxulf7cfun6xt274btvnqvaorliem5j6sqjiwhdyd.onion/ – Empire Market

Note: I don’t know if the “Empire Market” above is trustworthy or not. It isn’t on DeepDotWeb’s “master list,” which I always consider to be reliable. At first glance, it looks like an AlphaBay clone (or at least it uses their layout). Let’s see if it perseveres!

empire_market_edited

The market designates that it’s “In Memory of Alexandre Cazes,” the late admin of AlphaBay, which would explain its similar look. Perhaps this will be the subject of a future post.

Anyhow, check out All Onion Services and see if you can find anything interesting. If you’re looking for red rooms, that may take awhile.

Dark Web Secret Societies?

I’ve noticed that one of the common questions regarding the dark web is whether or not you can find websites for secret societies on it – especially the Illuminati. Why am I not surprised?

triangles-on-the-dark-web-illuminati-confirmed

Personally, in my experiences on the dark web so far, I have not come across anything relating to the Illuminati, per se, but I did find some other sites on which the groups referred to themselves as secret societies (or something similar).

One of the sites in question was called “Zadier Secret Society,” and I had found the link on Welcome to Dark Web Links and More!, which was one of the first sites I ever visited on Tor.

darkweblinks&more

At the time I clicked on it, the site was active. I remember that it took me to a login page, which you couldn’t get past without a username and password. It also featured a message that said, “We can see you. It doesn’t matter if you’re using Tor and a VPN, we can still see you!”

That may not have been true; perhaps it was just intended to freak out visitors to the site. Still, it was obvious that they didn’t want just anyone visiting. There are many sites like this on Tor, which isn’t that surprising, given that it’s designed for anonymity. More recently, I clicked on the same link, and it was down (hey, it’s Tor; what did you expect?).

There’s one “group” that I’ve encountered more recently that seems to still be active, however. One of their sites was called OWL’S CAGE (yes, in all caps), and is at http://bicxrvlly4dxueka.onion. I hate to disappoint you, readers, but last I checked, I got a “403 Forbidden” error when I clicked on the site.

403_forbidden

Now, does this mean only registered users can access it, or is the site incorrectly configured?

Anyway, some of the text on the site read:

The Form…

The File…

The Function…

Welcome to the World of Owl…

The Final Path is Near

The Dangers of the Era Conceals on IT!

Seek IT!

And you will find IT! 

…Good Luck!

Accompanying the text was a large image of an owl in the background. Again, I don’t have a copy of the exact image, but it looked similar to this:

owl

In a way, these sites reminded me a lot of the Cicada 3301 puzzles. They were rather vague, seemed to have a hidden meaning, and a secret society (apparently) created them.

While writing this, I did find one other site called jumpers – a big secret society (Egyptians only), which required a membership to access. Well, in case you couldn’t tell, I’m not Egyptian, so I guess that rules me out. (Oh well.) It looks cool, though, doesn’t it?

jumpers_secret_society_edited

Let me know if you come across more of these, readers!

You may find this ironic, but many of the more famous secret societies (for example, the Freemasons) have sites on the clearnet: http://www.freemasonnetwork.org/home

freemason_official

And here’s one that’s supposedly for the Illuminati: Illuminati Official Website

illuminati_official

While their activities may be secret to the public, their websites don’t appear to be (unless they have secret websites for members).

As with the rest of the dark web, I think some of this secret society stuff is hype, with a grain of truth to it.

If you happen to discover any new information I may have missed, of course, feel free to mention it in the comments…if it’s not too secretive, that is!

Shout Out to Italian Deep Web!

Earlier today, I was looking at my “stats,” and I happened to notice that I was getting some visitors from the site http://kbyz2vu3fnv2di7l.onion, a.k.a. Italian Deep Web.italian_onion.png

Now, I don’t know what the post was in regard to, but I just wanted to say, “Thanks for stopping by, guys!” I hope that you weren’t visiting for any negative reasons I should be concerned about; I have nothing against your site.

For those who don’t know about the site, it’s both a marketplace and forum hosted on Tor, but designed for Italian speakers.

As to why they mentioned this blog, I’m not sure, but I may have referenced them in a previous post (I’ve done several about darknet markets, after all). Maybe I’ll just have to stop by there in person and “introduce” myself.

Anyway, thanks for coming by and reading the blog, fellas.

Tor vs. I2P vs. Freenet: Difference?

GMpeM

When people think of the “dark web,” usually what comes to mind, if anything, is Tor. After all, it’s the one that’s been in the news most often, and the terms are inextricably linked.

If you’re new here, I should mention that in a couple of my previous posts, such as How to Access the Dark Web with I2P! and Exploring the Dark Web on Freenet (Part 3!), I elaborated on I2P and Freenet a little bit. These two are other popular anonymity networks that, like Tor, attempt to preserve users’ privacy. For the curious, I will sum up the three of them.

Tor

tor_linux

Tor, as I’ve mentioned on some earlier posts, is both a network and a browser. The browser is available at Tor Project. (Speaking of which, they just released a new version of the browser, which you should download if you want to use it!)

The network attempts to keep you anonymous while browsing online by directing your web traffic through a worldwide system of relays and nodes (a.k.a. the Tor network).

The browser, on the other hand, is a fork of Firefox, which is optimized for privacy. It includes plugins such as HTTPS Everywhere, which encrypts communications on a number of major sites. It also includes NoScript, which helps prevent exploits via plugins like JavaScript, Java, and Flash, and protects against attacks like cross-site scripting (XSS)and clickjacking.

Here’s one of the confusing parts: the sites that people often refer to as the “deep web” or “dark web” are technically called “Tor hidden services” (.onion sites). One of the other features of Tor is that you can host websites on it anonymously – thus why it’s so popular. I’ve listed quite a few onion sites on previous posts, but if it’s your first time here, these are a few examples:

Fresh Onions

Ahmia Search Engine

Daniel’s Hosting

Contrary to popular belief, not all onion sites have illegal or disturbing material on them. In fact, some are very bare bones and, dare I say, boring. That’s probably because the point wasn’t for them to be scary.  A good majority of onion sites are more technically oriented, although there are a plethora of scams too.

I2P

I2P_router_console_0.7.7

I2P, like Tor, is an anonymous overlay network. However, there are a number of differences between the two:

  • I2P is message-based. Communications are end-to-end encrypted, and each client application is referred to as a “router,” so to speak. The client has their router build several inbound and outbound tunnels, i.e. a pathway to another machine on the network. Each user on the network chooses the “length” of these tunnels, and finds a happy medium between anonymity and speed, depending on what he values. This is referred to as “garlic routing” (as opposed to onion routing).
  • I2P has its own interactive services, like web browsing (using any traditional browser like Firefox or Chrome), plus email, chat, file-sharing, messaging, blogging, and a distributed datastore (like that of Freenet). See more about this at I2P Services.
  • Unlike Tor, I2P can be used for torrenting, using applications like I2P Snark or the Bittorrent network: Bittorrent over I2P. While you technically can torrent over Tor, there’s a great chance that it will break your anonymity.

This is only a very basic summary – if you want to know more, click the links there and you can read some of the technical documentation.

Freenet

freenet_scifi

Freenet is a peer-to-peer (P2P) network which allows you to anonymously share files, send messages, and publish websites that are, in theory, resistant to censorship. It also uses what’s called a “distributed datastore” for the purpose of filesharing. In other words, users “donate” a portion of their hard drive so that other users can share files (the datastore is encrypted, however).

When you first join the network, you are given a cryptographic identifier (key), which, in essence, becomes your “name.” (Think of it like James Bond’s 007 name.) The key looks something like this: http://localhost:8888/freenet:USK@ZVtoHFm~Lm5FctbjloVYwQ0b5KaAae6TeQGk8fswJs4,kRR5rHBQuNpaiFqZE-v3Rtv0e~LWFFbxbh9tAt44UEM,AQACAAE/ffffff/12/  And you thought onion links were hard to remember!

One major difference between Tor and Freenet is that all of the Freenet sites are listed in directories that you can find inside the network (which isn’t always the case with Tor). For example, there is one directory called “Nerdageddon,” which lists many (but not all) of the Freenet sites. However, it excludes pornographic sites and other such material:

freenet_nerdageddon

When you click on a site, your computer “downloads” the page from Freenet, and you must wait for it to load before being able to browse it:

freenet_downloading_censored

Although it’s for different reasons, Freenet, like Tor, tends to be slow. Again, it’s a trade-off between anonymity and speed, so it depends on which you value most. As opposed to Tor, if you want to join social networks or forums on Freenet, you need to download various plugins, such as Sone (a Facebook-like social network) or WebofTrust.

The upside of this is that you aren’t downloading programs from some random onion site  that you happened across, which may or may not have malicious intent. Plus, Freenet has the option of operating in either “opennet” or “darknet” modes. In opennet mode, you connect to anyone on the network, whereas in darknet mode, you connect only to friends.

Summing it Up

In any case, I find all of these networks to be interesting, and if you’re curious, I say explore them. Just know what you’re getting into, and if you don’t understand something, read the documentation or ask.

That’s not a crime, is it?

 

The “Shadow Web” Cited Me? Awesome!

Given that I’ve written a few past posts about the so-called “Shadow Web,” I was flattered when I came across a more recent site by that name, and they had quoted something I had written a while back when, ironically, I was less familiar with the dark web.

“The reason it’s so difficult to access the shadow web is that first, you would need a browser (such as Tor) that provides easier access to hidden sites (like .onion URLs). Then, you would most likely be given the specific URL by someone in the know, or use a search engine geared toward searching the deep web.”

I find this funny for several reasons: the statements I made at the time were not entirely accurate. Tor doesn’t really “provide easier access to hidden sites,” although at one time it was the only way you could access .onion URLs. Since there are now Tor2web proxies (like onion.to and onion.link), through which you can access Tor hidden services from the clearnet, you don’t necessarily have to have the Tor browser to reach them.

However, using the proxies is not a safe way to do so, because there’s a far greater chance that someone could spy on your web traffic in the process. They even warn you about this on some of the sites:

onionto

Also, at the time that I wrote the original post, I didn’t distinguish between “deep web” and “dark web” (which are still confusing terms for most people). I meant to say dark web, honest!!

tor2web

Regardless of my errors, thanks for citing me as a source, Mr. Shadow Web! The “new” Shadow Web site is located at http://shadowznwuibgi7w.onion, and looks somewhat similar to the previous ones. I attempted to take a screenshot of it, but that function was disabled (of course). In essence, it’s a black background with this picture at the top:

access the shadow web

The landing page of the so-called “Shadow Web” site

The only difference between my picture and theirs is that theirs says “Access The Shadow Web” at the top. This time around, they feature an FAQ of sorts, to try to “debunk” some of the “myths” about the Shadow Web…

And I quote…

# 1 Shadow Web is a myth or true

ANSWER: IT IS TRUE

# 2 Is Shadow Web somewhere deep hidden under something unbelievable?

ANSWER: NO. THAT WAS A MISSUNDERSTANDING [sic]. ITS [sic] NOT DEEP UNDER, OR SOME MAGIC PROTECTED. IS JUST A SPECIAL INTERNET, SEPERATE [sic], UNACCESSIBLE AND FOR THIS INVISIBLE TO GUYS THAT DO NOT HAVE THE ACCESS-KEYS TO ENCRYPT THE URL AND INFORMATIONS. IN OUR PACKET WE GIVE YOU 1000+ DIFFERENT KEYS. ON SOME SHADOW WEB SITES YOU CAN GET MORE FORE FREE. THERE ARE SOME SPECIAL ONES YOU HAVE TO PAY. THIS DEPEND ON WHAT YOU WANT TO GET. MOST ARE FREE.

# 3 Do I need a Super Computer for Access

ANSWER: NO. THAT IS JUST A STORY FOR STOP [sic] KIDS AND IDIOTS TO TRY.

Aw, man! And I just bought a new super computer! I won’t list all of the “FAQ” section here, but you get the basic idea. Anyhow, according to them, in order to access the site, you need to pay $295 in bitcoin, which seems a bit extravagant.

How to Create Your Own Shadow Web!

OpenVPN-Setup-on-Linux

In response to this, I thought I’d explain how you could actually create a “shadow web.” Just as there are a number of different ways to accomplish anonymity online, so are there many different networks that use these methods.

It might be something like the network dn42, which is a large VPN using various internet technologies, such as BGP, whois database, and DNS. Participants in dn42 connect to one another via network tunnels like OpenVPN and Tinc – however, dn42 is not technically part of the internet, because it doesn’t use the internet protocol (IP). Confused yet?

In other words, you could create a VPN-based hidden network, using a network tunnel. ChaosVPN, which I mentioned in some earlier posts, is also a VPN-based network. For full details on how to join dn42, click the link above.

Or it could be something like The Darknet Project – as they describe it, “A Darknet is a portion of routed, allocated IP space in which no active services or servers reside. These are “dark” because there is, seemingly, nothing within these networks.”

A third method might be to create a wireless mesh network, as I’d mentioned a couple of posts ago, but one that only you and a small number of people had access to – something like goTenna Mesh (as one example). Or, perhaps it would be something like a Freifunk network. Of course, you would need the right hardware for this, and you would have to find others to join, but that would just take a bit of time and effort.

So, in theory, a “shadow web” might be a private network that uses protocols other than the internet protocol, a darknet of some kind, or a wireless mesh network with a select few participants.

This, however, does not mean there actually is a Shadow Web – I just thought it was fun to consider how you could create one.

Will you be the first to do it? I dare you!

shadow-people

Darkfox: Access the Dark Web with Ease!

darkfox

NOTE: Darkfox will not help you access .clos, .rdos, .lll, or .loky domains. Those don’t exist!! It will help you access .onion, .I2P, and 127.0.0.1:8888 URIs.

by Ciphas

This may sound like an infomercial, but I swear it’s not.

Those of you who use darknets, in particular Tor, I2P, and Freenet, might have noticed that it can sometimes be inconvenient to have to run each one in a separate browser, or at least have to launch the programs separately.

Well, I found a program that makes it simpler to connect to any of these three networks with a simple command: it’s called Darkfox Launcher.

Its advantage is that it lets you access Tor, I2P, or Freenet without having to change your configurations every time. Plus, it’s very simple to use.

The GitHub page goes into a little more detail, but one of the most important questions it answers is: “How does Darkfox Launcher work?”

Here’s the answer: “Darkfox Launcher works by first changing the default profile of the Firefox Portable software and with that, changing the default network configuration. Once this phase is done, Darkfox will proceed by launching the Darknet proxy software to make the connection to the Darknet chosen by the user. When completed, Firefox Portable will boot to the default startpage of that specific Darknet.”

Darkfox is also a convenient way of quickly accessing one of these networks if, say, you need to contact someone through the network and don’t want to go through the process of installing, for example, I2P.

Included in its software package are these things: Firefox Portable Edition, and the proxy software from the Tor Project, the Invisible Internet Project (I2P), and the Freenet Project. If you’re unfamiliar with each of these, it might help to check them out individually first!

So what’s my opinion? I’ve been using it for a little while now, and while it does have a few bugs, I love it. (Besides, what software doesn’t have bugs, especially in the early stages?)

And you may have noticed that, since it’s on GitHub, Darkfox Launcher is also open source. To that end, if you want to fork it and contribute to the code, feel free.

Now, its downside is that it isn’t as secure as the actual Tor browser. So, if you’re doing some kind of hardcore whistleblowing, or engaging in illicit activities, I don’t recommend Darkfox for you. It’s still a work-in-progress, though, so future versions will probably have improved security features.

On a side note, this may just be nostalgia, but its UI reminds me of both the DOS command prompt and the Bash Unix shell. *Nerding out*

While it may not be about bells and whistles, I think Darkfox Launcher accomplishes its purpose well. For more information about it, check out the Darkfox Read Me: https://github.com/blacklight447/Darkfox-Launcher/blob/master/README.md.

If that’s not enough, take a look at its source code here: https://github.com/blacklight447/Darkfox-Launcher/blob/master/darkfox%20code

darkfox_sourcecode

Who knows? Perhaps in the future, it will have the ability to launch Tor and do your taxes.