Is it Safe to Use Facebook on Tor?


Awhile ago, I was reading an article about Tor, and it had said that one of the most popular “Tor hidden services” was Facebook (go figure).

I’ve known for awhile that you could use Facebook with Tor, but my question about it is that because most people use their real names on Facebook, would using it with Tor defeat the purpose?

As put it in their 2014 article What Is Facebook’s Tor ‘Hidden Service?’ Why Does It Matter?, “The world’s least anonymous social network has joined Tor, a network that enables online anonymity.” Is that ironic, or what?

The same article made this point about the service:

…according to Wired, former Tor developer Runa Sandvik explains, ‘No, you’re not anonymous to Facebook when you log in, but this provides a huge benefit for users who want security and privacy.’ She notes, ‘You get around the censorship and local adversarial surveillance, and it adds another layer of security on top of your connection.’

So, I suppose that’s the advantage of using Facebook over Tor. Plus, if Facebook is censored in your country, you would still be able to access it via a Tor connection.

One exception might be that if you don’t use your real name on Facebook, you would be slightly more anonymous than the majority of Facebook users. If you do that in combination with a Tor connection, that makes a little more sense.


For those of you who haven’t used Facebook via Tor yet, its onion URL is facebookcorewwwi.onion. I’ve noticed that there are a plethora of phishing sites claiming to be Facebook as well, but that’s the only official one.


The question is, do you trust Facebook at all? I confess that yes, I’m on it, and it’s about the least anonymous social network out there. I joined it way before I had even heard of Tor or the dark web. Maybe I’m just addicted to Bejeweled Blitz.


Early on into my Tor journey, I was using The Hidden Wiki, and they had a link to Facebook’s onion site. The description read, “Facebook(?) Claims not to keep logs. Trust them at your peril.” In fact, whoever wrote it expressed doubt that the URL was even legit. I found this a bit ironic as well, considering how many untrustworthy sites exist on Tor!

To answer the question, I suppose using Facebook via Tor is about as safe as using it on the clearnet, but if you’re trying to hide your identity, then I don’t recommend it.

You may want to stick with the other social networks on Tor in that case.



Psycho Social Network 2.0: It’s a Secret to Everybody


As you may or may not know, the dark web tends to be kind of a secretive place (hence the word “dark” in its name).

In my earlier post Tor Social Networks: Oct. 2017 Update, I mentioned a site called Psycho Social Network, which is still active to this day. That makes me happy, because we psychos need to stick together.

So, I found out that its creators have made a new site by the name of Psycho Social Network 2.0. Notwithstanding, the second site is invite-only, and I’m not about to give out any invite codes.

If you want to join, you’ll have to become a member of the original site and get to know people; they then may give you an invitation.



The second site is a bit similar, though it uses a GUI that looks a little like Facebook’s (yes, I used the “F-word”). To be honest, a lot of the Tor social networks do the same thing. Hate on Facebook all you want, but up until recently, they have been the social network kings (though I hear that Snapchat is overtaking them in popularity).


Anyhow, PSN2.0 doesn’t seem to have a lot of activity on it just yet, which is probably due to its limited membership. I’m hoping that that will change, but again, anytime you have some sort of an exclusive group, you can’t expect it to have millions of members. In fact, someone made this point about the mythological “Marianas Web”; if it’s so secretive, there couldn’t be very many people on it!

Like the original, the second Psycho Social Network seems focused on comparable content. I was told not to go into specifics, however; again, if you want to find out, see if you can get an invite!

Because it’s called Psycho Social Network, I can’t help but expect to get friend requests like this, however:


Just kidding! Actually, most of the people I’ve met on PSN (both 1.0 and 2.0) seem pretty friendly. In fact, like some of them, I have a love of gore images and sick sites, as well as hacking and security. So I think we should get along nicely.

Contrary to popular belief, the dark web does not consist only of murderers and sickos (though there might be a few). I did see the occasional post or group that looked like a scam, but I’ve come to expect that by now. It is Tor, after all.

Anyway, if you are interested in joining PSN, click the link I gave above. If you want to join the second one, make some friends, and they just might invite you.

Stay psycho, everyone!

DuckDuckGo is not a Dark Web Search Engine

I hear people tossing around the idea that DuckDuckGo is a “dark web search engine” a lot on some of the sites that I write for, so I think this needs clarification.

While it is a great clearnet search engine that doesn’t track you (and thus respects your privacy), it isn’t a Tor search engine, per se.


That being said, DuckDuckGo does have its own Tor hidden service, at http://3g2upl4pq6kufc4m.onion/. Despite this, even the Tor version is still a clearnet search engine (I’m saying this just to confuse you).

For those of you who don’t know what I’m talking about, let me explain. If you go onto DuckDuckGo’s Tor site and do a search, most of the results will be clearnet (non-Tor) sites, as in this example:


On the other hand, if you use a search engine like not EvilCandle, or Welcome to Dark Web Links, these will return results for .onion sites (although the last one has a clearnet search option as well). See below for examples:





Something ironic that I noticed about the last one (Welcome to Dark Web Links) was that if you do a clearnet search with it, most of the results are quite disturbing! Go figure, right? Try doing one and you’ll see what I mean.

As I’ve said before, terms like “deep web,” “dark web,” and “clearnet” are often confusing, and though I use them, I could see how people would mix them up. Although Tor has a reputation of being a “dark web browser,” it really isn’t. Many people use Tor just to access the clearnet anonymously; Tor’s website explains a bit more about this: Tor Project: Overview.

Plus, contrary to popular belief, there are many disturbing sites on the clearnet, if you look hard enough. For instance, watch this video: 5 Most Disturbing Quarantined Subreddits – ReignBot; those are the types of sites people might expect to find on the dark web, and yet here they are on the clearnet.

Anyhow, although DuckDuckGo will sometimes come up with .onion sites in its search results, I don’t suggest using it as a “dark web search engine,” so to speak. It’s best if you stick to the ones that I mentioned above for that purpose.

Have fun in your dark web travels, readers! Don’t get lost.


Blockstack: A Decentralized Internet?

Given that I’m interested in alternative networks and/or browsers, I was immediately intrigued when I heard about Blockstack, which its developers describe as “a new internet for decentralized apps.”

blockstack_editedBlockstack uses the application layer of the traditional internet (the one you use every day, in other words), and offers tools for decentralized storage, authentication, and identity.

The apps are run through the Blockstack Browser, which you can also download from the site. (Note: if you want the Linux version, it’s a shell script.) Developers write the apps in JavaScript, and then plug into user-run APIs, cutting out the idea of central control points.

In a sense, this is similar to the Osiris system which I mentioned on an earlier post, Curious About Osiris? (i.e. there’s no central server or control point, and it operates in a decentralized manner). One major difference is that Blockstack is still actively being developed and maintained, and it will also eventually make use of cryptocurrencies and other technology.

At the moment, I’m not using the full browser, just the web app, which has limited functionality. Even so, the web app has several user-ready apps that you can try out, as well as several “token portfolio apps,” which you can log into via Blockstack.



Graphite, for instance (under the “user-ready apps”), is a decentralized, encrypted replacement for things like Google G-Suite and Microsoft Office. Aww man, but I already have LibreOffice! (I kid.)


Though I do use LibreOffice at home, there are times when I may not have access to it, or may want to try an alternative. With any of these apps, you merely sign in with Blockstack, and you’re all set (similar to syncing things with your Google account, if that’s what you’re accustomed to).

Like LibreOffice, MS Office, etc., Graphite has several different apps within it, called Documents, Sheets, Contacts, and Conversations:


Documents, for example, is a word processor, and sheets (in case you couldn’t tell) is a spreadsheet. The interfaces look a bit similar to things like Google Docs and Google Hangouts, but they’re very simple and, of course, decentralized.

One downside might be that if you don’t know anyone else who’s using Blockstack, there wouldn’t be anyone to have “conversations” with yet, but you can always let people know about it…

This is mostly based on my first experience with these, so I don’t yet have a full grasp of Blockstack’s capabilities. Nonetheless, my first impressions are very positive. Besides, every piece of software has beta versions, doesn’t it?

Well guys, keep up the good work. I think we need many more decentralized browsers and apps, and this is a great start.

Besides, how can you not like something with an app called CoinKitty?


Dark Web Secret Societies?

I’ve noticed that one of the common questions regarding the dark web is whether or not you can find websites for secret societies on it – especially the Illuminati. Why am I not surprised?


Personally, in my experiences on the dark web so far, I have not come across anything relating to the Illuminati, per se, but I did find some other sites on which the groups referred to themselves as secret societies (or something similar).

One of the sites in question was called “Zadier Secret Society,” and I had found the link on Welcome to Dark Web Links and More!, which was one of the first sites I ever visited on Tor.


At the time I clicked on it, the site was active. I remember that it took me to a login page, which you couldn’t get past without a username and password. It also featured a message that said, “We can see you. It doesn’t matter if you’re using Tor and a VPN, we can still see you!”

That may not have been true; perhaps it was just intended to freak out visitors to the site. Still, it was obvious that they didn’t want just anyone visiting. There are many sites like this on Tor, which isn’t that surprising, given that it’s designed for anonymity. More recently, I clicked on the same link, and it was down (hey, it’s Tor; what did you expect?).

There’s one “group” that I’ve encountered more recently that seems to still be active, however. One of their sites was called OWL’S CAGE (yes, in all caps), and is at http://bicxrvlly4dxueka.onion. I hate to disappoint you, readers, but last I checked, I got a “403 Forbidden” error when I clicked on the site.


Now, does this mean only registered users can access it, or is the site incorrectly configured?

Anyway, some of the text on the site read:

The Form…

The File…

The Function…

Welcome to the World of Owl…

The Final Path is Near

The Dangers of the Era Conceals on IT!

Seek IT!

And you will find IT! 

…Good Luck!

Accompanying the text was a large image of an owl in the background. Again, I don’t have a copy of the exact image, but it looked similar to this:


In a way, these sites reminded me a lot of the Cicada 3301 puzzles. They were rather vague, seemed to have a hidden meaning, and a secret society (apparently) created them.

While writing this, I did find one other site called jumpers – a big secret society (Egyptians only), which required a membership to access. Well, in case you couldn’t tell, I’m not Egyptian, so I guess that rules me out. (Oh well.) It looks cool, though, doesn’t it?


Let me know if you come across more of these, readers!

You may find this ironic, but many of the more famous secret societies (for example, the Freemasons) have sites on the clearnet:


And here’s one that’s supposedly for the Illuminati: Illuminati Official Website


While their activities may be secret to the public, their websites don’t appear to be (unless they have secret websites for members).

As with the rest of the dark web, I think some of this secret society stuff is hype, with a grain of truth to it.

If you happen to discover any new information I may have missed, of course, feel free to mention it in the comments…if it’s not too secretive, that is!

Thanks for Quoting Me!

by Ciphas

On occasion, I’ve noticed that some other blogs and sites have quoted (or should I say plagiarized?) articles I’ve written.

Some people would be offended by this, I suppose, but in a way, I’m rather flattered. After all, they wouldn’t have quoted me if they didn’t like what I had written. I’m sure this happens all the time on the internet, right?

Call it the writer in me, but I was taught in high school and college to always cite my sources. While I do paraphrase from time to time, I feel a twinge of guilt if I don’t cite them.

In my earlier post Exposing A Scam: V3RDAD, I mentioned that this particular person was attempting to get people to download some kind of software that supposedly allowed you to access another anonymity network. Perhaps I was a little harsh on him – so I apologize, V3RDAD. No hard feelings!

It was this same person who quoted my blog (and some articles I had written) on his blog, .NOW.H3R3.


So, as a gesture of friendship, I say go check out his blog – he has some interesting technological reviews on there.

The passages that he quoted, however, were on the articles ChaosVPN and The OpenNIC Project, albeit in Portuguese:

“Você tem que admitir isso – mesmo o nome parece intrigante, não é? ChaosVPN é uma VPN destinada a conectar hackers e hackerspaces. O Chaos Computer Club, com sede em Hamburgo, na Alemanha, projetou-o.”

In English, that would be “You have to admit it – even the name sounds intriguing, doesn’t it? ChaosVPN is a VPN designed to connect hackers and hackerspaces. The Chaos Computer Club, based in Hamburg, Germany, designed it.”

This was quoted directly from an article I wrote for Deepdotweb about ChaosVPN, called ChaosVPN: The Hackers’ VPN!


Really, it doesn’t matter. I’m sure this kind of thing happens all the time, but I do like to get credit for my work! One inaccuracy I must point out, though, is that on the blog, it says that ChaosVPN has something to do with the Shadow Web (one of the myths about it), and it certainly doesn’t. It’s merely a VPN, and nothing more mysterious than that.


As I’ve addressed on previous entries, there is no such thing as the “Shadow Web,” although I’m sure many people will still believe in it (just as people think there’s a flat Earth. Don’t get me started on that!).

Anyhow, to anyone that copied what I wrote, I don’t take it personally. I assume that you just found the articles interesting, and wanted to repost them. No worries.

To return the favor, I’ll link to a few of V3RDAD’s posts:

Site na ZeroNet hospeda arquivos vazados da NSA


Invisible IRC

Enjoy. Stay safe in your dark web travels.

Who Is Selling My Data?


by Ciphas

While I know this blog is primarily about the “dark web,” I think it’s easy to forget that the purpose of the dark web is privacy and anonymity (not sick stuff).

As I’d mentioned in my earlier post Is Your Password on the Dark Web? Maybe., it’s easy to unknowingly have your data stolen and, in some cases, passed around the dark web.

By the same token, there’s a good chance that advertisers have also mined and sold your personal data – be that your name, address, phone number, or something else. This article from Lifehacker, though it came out in 2013, has a list of some of the major companies that may have sold your data: The Top 50 Companies That Mine And Sell Your Data (and How to Opt Out).

If you want to skip that, the actual list is here: Master List of Data Broker Opt-Out Links. Click on any one of the links on this list to opt out of having your data sold.


Of course, this is only one site, but it does seem to be very comprehensive, and covers a lot of the data broker sites. If you have time, I suggest going through each one and having your name removed, if necessary.

These are also good sites to take a look at, for the same reason: How to Protect Your Data

Granted, if this sort of thing doesn’t matter to you, then don’t worry about it. The reason I mention it at all is that if you don’t want unscrupulous people to get hold of your personal information, it’s best to remove it, if at all possible.

I say this knowing that today is the social media age, where people constantly post selfies and videos of themselves doing who-knows-what, including pictures of themselves having sex. Which I would never do…really!

Anyhow, if this is something that concerns you, check these sites out. It may be creepy what you find.