Exploring More Dark Web Search Engines

Unbeknownst to me up until today, there are even more Tor search engines which can help you wade through the “ominous” dark web.

Granted, these vary in quality quite a bit. Some haven’t indexed as many links, while others don’t seem to return relevant results (which probably has a lot to do with their search algorithms, more than anything).

One of the search engines I just began experimenting with is called Poopak. That name would’ve made me snicker in first grade, but I’m a bit older than that now. It can be found at http://3cuarxyaxke2hmlk.onion.


One of the things I found interesting about Poopak is that it lists the number of possible onions (1,208,925,819,614,629,174,706,176) as opposed to the number of alive onion pages (3274). That seems ridiculous when you think about it, doesn’t it?

As they said on All Onion Services, “…there aren’t very many online onion services.” Of course, these numbers can change, but the types of sites that you’ll find won’t change much.

I tried some of my usual searches on Poopak, like “video games,” “red rooms,” and “forum.” To my surprise, “red room” didn’t return any results! Maybe they decided to filter out that search? I’m disappointed.


I had much better luck when typing in “forum,” or “links.” Still, it looks as though Poopak hasn’t indexed as many onions as some of the tried and true search engines, like not Evil. At present, it seems to be rather hit-and-miss when it comes to finding specific results, but you can give it a shot if you like.


haystak calls itself “the darknet’s largest search engine,” which is quite a feat, considering how many Tor hidden services there are, and how much competition it now has. It can be found at http://haystakvxad7wbk5.onion

At the time of this writing, it says, “We’ve indexed 1.5 billion pages over 260,000 onions (including historical onions).” Does this mean that the original Silk Road is on it, for instance? That would be interesting.

A search for “silk road” turned up mostly results for Silk Road 3.1, which is still active at the moment. My intention, of course, was to try to find a cached copy of the one and only Silk Road (yes, that one), but I was unsuccessful on the first try.

As it turns out, when your search results come up, you can also look for cached versions of sites (as on Google), or “historical versions” of sites that have been shut down (like SIGAINT), or just ones that have disappeared for one reason or another.

There’s a catch, though – to access certain content (such as the cached versions of sites), you need to upgrade to a paid account. Hey, nothing on the dark web is for free, right? Still, at least you can use its basic functions without paying.

I haven’t found anything of particular significance on Haystak yet, but that shouldn’t discourage you!

In any case, it sounds to me like the dark web hasn’t completely been “discovered” yet. 1,208,925,819,614,629,174,706,176 onions? I’m off to visit all of them!






“Secret” Dark Web Links?

People often ask me if there are “secret” or “hidden” dark web links that aren’t available on the public link lists. In fact, someone did so yesterday, which was what prompted this post.

To be honest, I think this is one of the many myths about the dark web; people explore the few links that are on The Hidden Wiki (or similar link lists), find them boring, and then ask, “Where’s the real interesting stuff?”

Well, as I mentioned on All Onion Services: New URL, if it isn’t on that site (with regard to Tor at least), it isn’t anywhere. Not only does that site have v1 onions, but also v2 and v3 (the ones with 50 characters).allonionsv2_edited

Of course, finding actual onions that are online when using All Onion Services can be quite difficult, as none of them are labeled or sorted into categories. Yet, as I’ve also mentioned on quite a few other blog posts, there are many link lists and search engines on Tor.

While these may not index everything, I’ve managed to find some interesting sites through these methods. In past posts, I have referenced several other link lists, which I still use to this day. I’ll include those here, plus a few that I just came across:

http://jdpskjmgy6kk4urv.onion – Welcome to Dark Web Links and More!


http://darkdirmpmoq3uur.onion – DarkDir

http://zlal32teyptf4tvi.onion – Fresh Onions


http://xvwhmrw3sgwwmkko.onion – Atlayo Search Engine

http://5jgis47vdcpaeafp.onion – La Wiki Oculta (for my Spanish readers!)

http://deeplinkdeatbml7.onion – DeepLink

In addition to these, there are the various search engines, such as the following:

http://hss3uro2hsxfogfq.onion – not Evil


http://visitoroymk3ouq7.onion/search – VisiTOR

http://gjobqjj7wyczbqie.onion/ – Candle


http://msydqstlz2kzerdg.onion/ – Ahmia (also at http://ahmia.fi)


http://bznjtqphs2lp4xdd.onion – Welcome to Dark Web Links Search Engine


These are just a few examples, but my feeling is that if you can’t find what you’re looking for on one of these link lists or search engines, it probably isn’t there. If you’re looking for something besides Tor, try I2P or Freenet.

Here are a few I2P links:






There are many others, but that’s what I could find at the moment.

Every so often, I do come across sites I haven’t seen before, but the content on them tends to be about the same: marketplaces, forums, fraud sites, scams, wikis, and the occasional game site or weird site.

Other than that, if you’re just looking for sick content (that doesn’t involve children), it’s probably on the clearnet – contrary to popular belief.

If there’s something I missed here, feel free to tell me, but I think that about covers it.




Site Feature: Dark Clouds/saysamaim

So, a reader contacted me recently and asked if I would check out their site(s), which I did. They have both a clearnet site and a couple of Tor hidden services.

The clearnet site is called saysamaim, and seems to be a sort of tribute to all things “darknet”:


On the landing page is a sort of “definition” of the darknet:

“Most people like us confused about the term like Dark net or Deep Web[sic]! It is a big part of the internet that can’t be found or indexed by search engines such as Google, Bing, Yahoo, and DuckDuckGo. For example, your bank account page is also part of the dark net sites. On the other side anything you can see in the search results, that s [sic] called Surface Web. Darknet sites contain weird URLs and also [sic] known as .onion sites (Hidden services sites) [.] Dark marketplaces sale [sic] all kinds of legal and illicit goods anonymously for other currencies such as Bitcoins. When companies are hacked and their data is stolen, that stolen data [is] often used for sale on the so-called Darknet.”

I’m not certain, but this sounds like something I wrote at one point online; if so, thanks for paraphrasing me! I must make a few corrections, however – your bank account page is in the “deep web,” not the darknet, per se. If a page is indexed by search engines, it’s on the surface web, as the site says. And as I’ve mentioned on this blog before, .onion sites are one example of “dark web” URLs (on Tor, at least).

Here’s one of the next-gen onion URLs, for instance: http://occgshn6gz4je57wyhpijni7waod6yxpxwihjdxjwrnpjtbayliei2id.onion/ It’s a site called Cyberia.


Anyhow, I don’t fault people for not being native English speakers, but I hate the spread of misinformation about the dark web. Some of this is unintentional, as I believe many of the technical aspects of darknet software can be hard to understand.

On other parts of the site are a “darknet guide,” if you will, a contact form, and a list of hacking tools. In addition, there’s an about page, and copies of 973-eht-namuh-973.com and Joy of Satan, two sites which are often referred to as being part of the “dark web,” but aren’t.



This same group also runs two Tor hidden services, called Dark Street and Dark CloudNet.




Both of these are forums, more or less. They seem to revolve around the typical kinds of activity you would expect on Tor: carding, drugs, etc. Because I’m new to the forums, I have no idea if any of it is legit or not. Based on my experience with the dark web over the past two years, I tend to approach these kinds of things with a healthy degree of skepticism.

That’s not to say that the forums don’t look cool; I thought the format worked very well. Whoever programmed them used MyBB software, which is pretty tried-and-true for that purpose, as you may know.

One thing that’s intriguing about Dark Street is that certain sections are “locked,” i.e. you need a password to access them. See if you can figure out what that is!

In any case, the forums are rather similar to other carding/hacking forums I’ve seen, but they could use some more traffic. Want to check them out, readers? Click the links.

They’re real…I promise.




All Onion Services: New URL

Awhile back, I mentioned the site All Onion Services (AOS), which lists every .onion site that exists on Tor. At one point, it had existed on the clearnet at onions.system33.pw, but this is no longer the case. (“system33”, a.k.a. Matt Traudt, is one of the developers. Thanks, Matt!)

At present, the site can be found on Tor at http://jld3zkuo4b5mbios.onion/. While this is true, the developers have expanded their site since I last wrote about it.allonionsv2_edited

As before, however, this link list is, as they put it, “The longest and least useful onion index in the galaxy.” Does this mean it includes illegal stuff? Sure, but good luck finding it! I’d also describe it as the most boring-looking onion index in the galaxy, but that was probably on purpose as well (wink).

I have attempted, in the past, to find “interesting” sites just by clicking random links on AOS, without much luck. Most of the ones listed are not online (which they mention). One difference between this updated version of the site and the original is that this one lists next-gen onion services (both v2 and v3).

V3 onions have 50 characters in them, so there are a lot more possibilities for an onion URL now (but don’t ask me to memorize them). Here are a few examples:





Because these are somewhat new, most aren’t online (nonetheless, this is the case with the v1 onion services too). If you are looking for onion links that are online, I’d suggest using some of the link lists that I’ve mentioned before, such as Fresh Onions, or The Onion Crate (which also has some of the v3 onion services).


If you can read the picture (which you probably can’t), I’ve got some more links in there! Here, just for you (descriptions are accurate, I promise!):

http://3xeiol2bnhrsqhcsaifwtnlqkylrerdspzua7bcjrh26qlrrrctfobid.onion/ – Riseup Red

http://occgshn6gz4je57wyhpijni7waod6yxpxwihjdxjwrnpjtbayliei2id.onion/ – Cyberia Cafe and Club

http://oqwc4xrfgysdgw52tercv56vl2tfk5u7r6dspr2g2mwsj3dvb7zef4id.onion/ – Daniel – Onion Link List

http://hsqluhqe6dlfl7jaxulf7cfun6xt274btvnqvaorliem5j6sqjiwhdyd.onion/ – Empire Market

Note: I don’t know if the “Empire Market” above is trustworthy or not. It isn’t on DeepDotWeb’s “master list,” which I always consider to be reliable. At first glance, it looks like an AlphaBay clone (or at least it uses their layout). Let’s see if it perseveres!


The market designates that it’s “In Memory of Alexandre Cazes,” the late admin of AlphaBay, which would explain its similar look. Perhaps this will be the subject of a future post.

Anyhow, check out All Onion Services and see if you can find anything interesting. If you’re looking for red rooms, that may take awhile.

Atlayo: Another Dark Web Social Network

Early on in my “journey” onto Tor, I had joined some social networks, like Blackbook and Galaxy2. Ever since then, these have fascinated me.

Blackbook, which I’ve mentioned on some recent posts, was the first I ever joined. It was down for quite some time, and its developer(s) relaunched it again not too long ago. Galaxy2 also shut down, soon to be replaced by Galaxy3, which has a similar look and feel.


So what is Atlayo, then? Like the other two, it’s a social media site on Tor (though Atlayo has a clearnet mirror), which emphasizes free speech and anonymity. Its Tor URL is atlayofke5rqhsma.onion, or atlayo.com on the clearnet (I’m not sure which came first).

As you can see, its UI looks a lot like Facebook’s, which isn’t uncommon with these Tor social networks. Like Facebook, it has a chat feature, groups, pages, etc. The main difference is that most people don’t use their real names (with a few exceptions), and people’s interests seem to center around certain things: hacking, coding, anarchy, and sometimes things like self-harm.

Or there’s perfectly innocuous stuff too, like Linux (yeah, seriously, it is “innocuous”).


I’ve only spent a brief amount of time on it, but in essence, it seems very similar to the other dark web social networks (with the notable exception of Psycho Social Network). It may be that it doesn’t have a lot of members yet, so I’d encourage you to join, if this interests you!

It’s worth noting that Atlayo also has its own search engine, at xvwhmrw3sgwwmkko.onion. However, one of the disturbing things about it is that it lists popular searches done by others, and let’s just say that some of them may make your jaw drop. Well, it’s Tor; what did I expect?

I’m not responsible for the searches done by others. I will say that searching for the term “deep web,” however, gets you quite a few results! Interestingly, the Atlayo search engine will also, on occasion, come up with clearnet links as well as .onion links. This differentiates it from some of the other Tor search engines.

So I suggest dropping by and checking it out (as long as shocking search results don’t bother you). Maybe I’ve become a little jaded with the dark web – perish the thought!



Accessing the Dark Web on Linux is Easy, Right?


It may seem silly to even write this, as most of the Linux users I know are very familiar with Tor (and other darknets as well).

Still, I thought it would be interesting to write about.

So, how do you install Tor on a Linux system? Well, that largely depends on what kind of Linux distribution you have, but there are similarities across the different ones.

The easiest part, of course, is downloading Tor. Use this link: Tor Browser for Linux (64-bit).

Ah, but wait! This isn’t the best way to download Tor on a Unix-like system; it’s better to use the shell.



Well, it just so happens that the Tor Project has specific instructions for Debian/Ubuntu users (of which I happen to be one).


On their main site, they list two options: Tor on Debian Stretch, and Tor on Ubuntu or Debian. If you’re using Debian, just run this command:

apt install tor

as root. They note that this will not always give you the most stable version of Tor, but the upside is that you will receive important security fixes (and that’s essential!). Next, go to this link: Running the Tor client on Linux/BSD/Unix

Alternately, if you’re building from source (the fun way, right?), first install libevent,
and then make sure you have openssl and zlib (including the -devel packages, if possible). After that, run:

tar xzf tor-; cd tor-
./configure && make

Once that’s done, you can run Tor as src/or/tor, or you can run make install (as root, if need be), which will install it to /usr/local.

EDIT: As one of my readers pointed out, I forgot to mention that once the daemon is running, you must set the proxy configurations on your browser this way: localhost ( as host, and the same port number that’s set in your tor config file (/etc/tor/tor.conf).

It could then take several minutes after the daemon execution to connect to Tor. To verify this, check your log file: (/var/log/tor/tor.log). If the daemon did connect properly, it will be recorded as such on the last line of the log file.

Assuming that all these conditions are met, you can then run Tor!

Please note: I’m paraphrasing some of this from the Tor Project’s website, so I want to give them due credit! If you read the documentation, they’ll elaborate further on “Torifying” your applications, as well as configuring a relay or setting up your own Tor hidden service.

Sound like fun? I hope it is! Now enjoy accessing the Shadow Web – on me.

Flare: A Beta Tor Search Engine


Those of you who love “links, links, links!” will be happy to know that there’s a very new search engine on Tor called Flare, which looks similar to Candle, another search engine. It’s at this URL: http://dlggj2krbqzm5dru.onion. Honestly, this was the first thing I pictured when I heard the name:

flare surf

Anyhow, Candle, as I mentioned on a previous post, is one of several search engines that indexes Tor hidden services. It’s not quite as popular as not Evil or Grams [EDIT: Grams no longer exists], but it gets the job done.


Flare, in turn, is very similar (in fact it may even be a fork), but because it’s in beta form, it still needs help with its algorithms and speed. One interesting (and somewhat disturbing) feature that it has, at present, is that it lists some previous searches done by other users to the right of the search results.

Being aware that a lot of people on the dark web are looking for CP, you can guess what kinds of search terms may show up there. Well, it’s Tor – what did I expect? I just wouldn’t want to meet any of these people in person.

Anyhow, the more that you use a particular search term, the faster it will come up in the future. I tried out the following searches:

“red room”





I believe I tried a few others too, but I don’t recall. Compared to a search engine like not Evil, it doesn’t get as many results, but like Candle, Flare seems more focused on getting relevant results, rather than the largest number.

Interestingly, out of the search terms above, “market” returned the most results, by far. Should I really be surprised by that? The first result was a site called “Counterfeit USD,” at this link: http://qkj4drtgvpm7eecl.onion


Seems legit.

I haven’t tried out their services, but my first instinct was that it’s a scam, because other sites like it have turned out to be scams. Speaking of which, Flare also has a “Scam: true or false” label beneath the search results. However, simply because a page is labeled “false” does not necessarily mean that it’s the real thing. I’ve been on the dark web long enough that I’ve started assuming that everything is a scam (or almost everything).

That aside, I like the search engine so far, and I recommend trying it out. Perhaps, if more people start using it, it will improve.

Hey, maybe you could even get your site indexed on it! (Hopefully not the scam version.)