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Can You Decrypt This?

YnkgQ2lwaGFz

I thought perhaps this post needed some explanation. I’ve joined a group that frequently communicates in code, and they inspired me to write a post completely (or mostly) in ciphertext.

So, what’s written below isn’t complete nonsense; it’s just encoded with two different types of ciphers. Can you figure out what it says?

761

Ijbigj djjn kb gbyj kej hgkjwuhkj wjhglkt xhnjd bu kej chwz fjo, db ejwj’d buj qbw tbr. Cjvbcj kej njddhxjd bu keld ibdk!

Tbr ehyj ojju dijvlhggt djgjvkjc kb sblu nj bu nt chwz fjo prjdk. Lq tbr hwj hogj kb cjvwtik fehk ehd ojju fwlkkju, L nht ehyj dbnj qrkrwj ighud qbw tbr.

VGhlIG15c3RlcnkgaGFzIGp1c3QgYmVndW4uIEkgaGF2ZSB0cmF2ZXJzZWQgdGhlIGRlcHRocywgYnV0IG1heSBub3QgYmUgYWJsZSB0byByZXR1cm4uIEkgc2VlayB5b3VyIGhlbHAuIENvbnRhY3QgbWUu

L hn vrwwjukgt cjyldlux h iraagj qbw tbr kb dbgyj, ork lk ld hd tjk ruqluldejc. Feju lk ld, L dehgg huubruvj lk ejwj.

U3BlYWsgdG8gbWUu

Darkfox: Access the Dark Web with Ease!

darkfox

NOTE: Darkfox will not help you access .clos, .rdos, .lll, or .loky domains. Those don’t exist!! It will help you access .onion, .I2P, and 127.0.0.1:8888 URIs.

by Ciphas

This may sound like an infomercial, but I swear it’s not.

Those of you who use darknets, in particular Tor, I2P, and Freenet, might have noticed that it can sometimes be inconvenient to have to run each one in a separate browser, or at least have to launch the programs separately.

Well, I found a program that makes it simpler to connect to any of these three networks with a simple command: it’s called Darkfox Launcher.

Its advantage is that it lets you access Tor, I2P, or Freenet without having to change your configurations every time. Plus, it’s very simple to use.

The GitHub page goes into a little more detail, but one of the most important questions it answers is: “How does Darkfox Launcher work?”

Here’s the answer: “Darkfox Launcher works by first changing the default profile of the Firefox Portable software and with that, changing the default network configuration. Once this phase is done, Darkfox will proceed by launching the Darknet proxy software to make the connection to the Darknet chosen by the user. When completed, Firefox Portable will boot to the default startpage of that specific Darknet.”

Darkfox is also a convenient way of quickly accessing one of these networks if, say, you need to contact someone through the network and don’t want to go through the process of installing, for example, I2P.

Included in its software package are these things: Firefox Portable Edition, and the proxy software from the Tor Project, the Invisible Internet Project (I2P), and the Freenet Project. If you’re unfamiliar with each of these, it might help to check them out individually first!

So what’s my opinion? I’ve been using it for a little while now, and while it does have a few bugs, I love it. (Besides, what software doesn’t have bugs, especially in the early stages?)

And you may have noticed that, since it’s on GitHub, Darkfox Launcher is also open source. To that end, if you want to fork it and contribute to the code, feel free.

Now, its downside is that it isn’t as secure as the actual Tor browser. So, if you’re doing some kind of hardcore whistleblowing, or engaging in illicit activities, I don’t recommend Darkfox for you. It’s still a work-in-progress, though, so future versions will probably have improved security features.

On a side note, this may just be nostalgia, but its UI reminds me of both the DOS command prompt and the Bash Unix shell. *Nerding out*

While it may not be about bells and whistles, I think Darkfox Launcher accomplishes its purpose well. For more information about it, check out the Darkfox Read Me: https://github.com/blacklight447/Darkfox-Launcher/blob/master/README.md.

If that’s not enough, take a look at its source code here: https://github.com/blacklight447/Darkfox-Launcher/blob/master/darkfox%20code

darkfox_sourcecode

Who knows? Perhaps in the future, it will have the ability to launch Tor and do your taxes.

Dark Web Links of the Day Pt. 1

blackmarketammo.png

by Ciphas

I’ve been receiving comments on my profile asking if I could post some links, so I’m more than happy to oblige. One thing I should remind my readers about, though – Tor and its darknet brethren are rife with scams. So if anything sounds too good to be true (triple your bitcoin in 2 seconds!!), then it probably is.

TorBay (forum) https://2or24opd2hkebadv.onion

Digital Gangster https://2fwqhlzx5dxiyggr.onion

IDC – Italian Darknet Community https://2qrdpvonwwqnic7j.onion/

Walmart Stuff https://42bu3fd5gaxu3xbn.onion

TorRoulette https://4mxhmvyfba2ji7lb.onion

W38M411 https://23tjl3xpt5btiqms.onion

GRAVES DESIGN https://362jdnvs4w5itsql.onion

How to Use I2P on Android Devices

by Ciphas

i2p_android

I’m well aware that not all “dark web” users prefer the Tor network (which I’ve mentioned in a few previous posts).

As I wrote about in How to Access the Dark Web with I2P!, I2P is one of the three most popular anonymity networks at the moment, next to Tor and Freenet. Out of those three, however, it’s arguably the most complicated to use.

That aside, if you already use it, and are interested in the Android app, it’s simple to download. Go to I2P – Android Apps on Google Play, and install it.

If you’re already familiar with using Tor on Android, then you may know the browser Orfox; download that first, from Google Play – Orfox.

device-2015-06-30-133152

As with the standard version of I2P, you need to configure your proxy settings to be able to connect to it on your mobile device.

Depending on which device you have, these may be in a different area, but this tutorial explains it quite well. (With the exception that the Orweb browser is outdated.)

To sum up – you’ll need to configure your proxy settings to 127.0.0.1 (localhost), port 4444 (HTTP). After this is finished, open the I2P app again and hold down the button that says “Long press to start I2P.”

i2p_longpress

Once you’ve started I2P, the app has to find peers on the network. This should only take a few minutes at most (depending on your connection, of course).

Finally, go to the “addresses” tab. There should be some default I2P sites (eepsites) listed there. You can add others if you wish. Actually, on my device, there was only one eepsite listed by default.

If you tap on the name of one of the eepsites, it may ask you which app you want to use to open it. Obviously, the tried and true Firefox is good. You can also use Orfox, as I mentioned.

Also, if you tap the “tunnels” tab, you’ll see which client tunnels and/or server tunnels are running. By default, some of the ones that run are the I2P HTTP/HTTPS Proxy, Irc2p, and smtp.postman.i2p (simple mail transfer protocol):

i2p_tunnels

You can, of course, customize it by adding your own client tunnels or server tunnels using the red “plus” button in the lower righthand corner (maybe that could be a subject for a future blog post…yesssss….).

Interestingly, the tutorial I referenced above recommends Lightning Web Browser, because it’s open-source and built for privacy, speed, and efficiency. It can also send traffic through Tor or I2P, and can be set to use DuckDuckGo or StartPage as its standard search engines. So give that one a try. If you’re curious about the source code, it’s here: GitHub: Lightning Browser.

Now, as for some other eepsites you can try out, here are some suggestions (but I haven’t vetted all of these, so some may not work):

https://sochi.i2p

https://speedie.i2p

https://sponge.i2p

https://nightfort.i2p

https://planet.i2p

https://oniichan.i2p

I hope that’s enough to get you started. Anyhow, have fun. I2P may not seem as “creepy” as Tor, but I would like to get a few more people to try it out, and maybe build more of a community on the network.

Enjoy your visit, friends!

What the Deep Web/Dark Web Isn’t!

by Ciphas

torbay

I suppose I should be expecting this by now, but there’s an enormous amount of misinformation about the deep web/dark web floating around. That’s the internet for you, right?

I bring this up because someone recently messaged me and said, “I clicked on a deep web site – am I in trouble??” (Surely I’m not the first to experience this.) So I talked to the guy for awhile, and as it turned out, the site he was referring to wasn’t a Tor site at all – it was just a site on Internet Archive: Wayback Machine, which keeps archives of old websites from the ’90s and early ’00s. One of them is this one:

064

Let me just get it all out there: visiting sites on there is perfectly fine; you won’t get in any trouble. Some of the sites may be creepy, but they are in no way related to the dark web. For those who don’t know anything about either the terms “deep web” or “dark web,” let me try to help out.

According to Wikipedia:

The deep web, invisible web, or hidden web are parts of the World Wide Web whose contents are not indexed by standard search engines for any reason. The opposite term to the deep web is the surface web. The deep web includes many very common uses such as web mail, online banking, but also paid for services with a paywall such as video on demand, and many more.

And as for the term “dark web”:

The dark web is the World Wide Web content that exists on darknets, overlay networks which use the public internet but which require specific software, configurations or authorization to access. The dark web forms a small part of the deep web, the part of the Web not indexed by search engines, although sometimes the term “deep web” is mistakenly used to refer specifically to the dark web.

welcometodarkweblinks

Confused still? This is why I consistently say “dark web” when I’m referring to sites on Tor, I2P, Freenet, etc. The word “dark” doesn’t refer to the fact that it’s disturbing content, but the fact that it’s hidden or encrypted. The opposite term to the dark web is “clearnet” (the sites which don’t require any special configurations to access).

Granted, sites like The Hidden Wiki show only a small sample of Tor links (most of which are scams, by the way!). They are a part of the dark web, though (regardless of their content).

If you’re looking for a site that offers a lot more links (once you’re connected to Tor), then go to Harry71’s Onion Spider. I’m sure there are scams on here, but the site is at least updated daily, and has a lot of different links.

What people may be looking for is more secretive or disturbing content, which may or may not exist. Trust me – you aren’t going to find the secret to immortality on the dark web. If that sort of thing can’t be found on the clearnet, it won’t be found on the dark web either!

And as for the “deep web horror stories” on YouTube, most (if not all) of them are bullshit. How do I know this? Because the technical details are wrong. Many of them talk about live-streaming video over Tor, which is near-impossible. Nonetheless, I still find them entertaining.

I’ll tell you what, though –  I have noticed that there are sites not listed in any of the link repositories or wikis, which sometimes have darker content, or are very exclusive sites (e.g. a members-only hacking forum that requires a referral from existing members). I’m not saying this to make your imagination run wild, but it’s something I have come across.

Beyond that, I’d say that the only sure way to learn how to discern fake sites from real ones, and myths from facts, is to visit the dark web yourself, and learn the ropes. There’s only so much information you can get from blogs and articles. The downside is that you may get screwed over in the process. A good rule of thumb is: if it looks sketchy, it probably is!

If you are looking for a good, factual FAQ, then check this out on Reddit: READ ME, NOOBS! – The “Short” FAQ

Anyhow, have fun exploring the dark web…and don’t get scammed.